Nutty Jalapeño Chicken Stuffed Peppers

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Ya”ll know we love to cook with some peanut butter here at the simmer, so I got pretty excited when I saw that the Southern Peanut Growers conducted its first “PB My Way” regional recipe contest, calling for the craziest, funnest, must surprising peanut butter recipes from around the country.

This winning recipe, submitted by Lori McLain of Denton, Texas, is the kind of idea what makes online casino australia people who hate PB say “WHY would you do that?” and people who love it shout GENIUS.

Sign me up for the latter category.

Nutty Jalapeño Chicken Stuffed Peppers

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Food Porn of the Day: Taco Time

Torchy

Tacos: what CAN”T they do? These are two of the most delicious varieties from the beloved Texas taco purveyor Torchy”s. The Brush Fire, on the right, is especially Vi har listet mange pokerrum og andre hjemmesider for poker, spillemaskiner online og betting, og de skifter deres kampagner, regler og regulativer. exciting: Jamaican jerk chicken, grilled jalapeños, mango, sour cream, cilantro, and a mysterious condiment known as “diablo sauce.” It”s sweet, spicy, citrus-y, and amazing.

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Waaaay Better Than Takeout: Sweet and Spicy Coconut Oil Stir Fry

Sweet and Spicy Stir Fry

I’ve written about my love for coconut oil before, especially for stir fries. Not only does it smell ridiculously amazing while you’re cooking with it, but it’s one of the only oils that’s truly stable enough to handle high-heat cooking (aka… stir fries, what up!) and its fats are more easily metabolized in the body, so it’s great for your heart! So let’s get cracking on this sooooo-much-better-than-takeout meal, shall we?

Tonight I got home from work and I was not. feelin’. it. I had a long weekend of partying at a music festival (I know, poor me) and the last thing I wanted to do was cook. I was fantasizing about some takeout, or at the very least a trip to the nearest Whole Foods salad bar. But my man Rob surprised me with a plethora of organic vegetables from his trip to the new Austin Trader Joe’s this afternoon, and if you know Trader Joe’s, you know that its produce doesn’t stay well for long. (Love you TJs, but it’s true!) The meal I whipped up for us was even better, and possibly quicker, than ordering from our nearest Chinese place. And it’s definitely healthier. All it took was a little bit of coconut oil, spices, and Chinese sauces (thick, sweet hoisin and oyster sauce, which doesn’t really taste like oysters but just adds a super salty depth of flavor).

Sweet & Spicy Coconut Oil Stir Fry

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From Sardines to Sausages: Exploring Portuguese Cuisine

ES guest writer Faith brings us the food travel lowdown on the savory land that is Portugal.

From freshly caught grilled sardines and salted dried cod dishes to hearty smoked sausage stews and the famous piri-piri chicken, Portugal has some seriously flavorful food. Paprika, garlic, bay leaves, chili and olive oil are popular additions to many Portuguese dishes, and the resulting flavors will leave you coming back for more. These popular dishes make this a culinary destination that deserves to be better known.

1. Pasteis de Nata – Portuguese Egg Custard Tarts

Pasteis de nata

The Pasteis de Nata is a creamy, flaky, egg custard tart, topped with sugar and cinnamon. The tart originated in Lisbon in the 18th century at a bakery in the Santa Maria de Belem parish, and the bakery itself has now become a popular tourist attraction, serving over 10,000 tarts a day. Lines are inevitable, but it’s well worth the wait to try this distinctive treat from its original source.

2. Pão – Bread

Traditionally, Portuguese meals were served on a slab of crusty bread to soak up all the juices and to provide a filling meal. Today, plates have replaced this method of serving food, but bread is still an integral part of most meals. Bread also varies widely from region to region, with each having its own speciality. Pão de Centeio is predominantly found in the North—this is a rye bread, which is dark and dense. The sweet Bolo de Ferradura loaf can be found in the Ribatejo region, combining unusual flavors such as star anise and lemon. It is often horseshoe-shaped and served at weddings to bring good luck. Pão com Chouriço is the Portuguese substitute for the American hotdog, but more delicious as it is made with Portuguese smoked sausage and fresh dough.

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Chicken Curry in a Hurry

chicken curry

Ya’ll know we’re not big fans of cheating here on Endless Simmer, but when it comes to curry, who has days to wait for that deliciousness? Guest writer Megan Sullivan offers up a quick tip for your curry fix.

A good curry uses several different spices that you blend together by hand, and can take several hours to prepare. However, there is a quick way to make a great curry that tastes like you spent hours slaving over a hot stove.

Traditional Indian cooking uses a clarified butter called ghee, which imparts a velvety texture to the sauce. You can mimic the effects of ghee by combining extra virgin olive oil with regular butter.

Quick Chicken Curry

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Sous-Vide Adventures: Don’t Be Chicken Edition

chicken

Sous-vide: it’s not just for beef (or cookie dough). In today’s guest post from Cuisine Solutions, learn how the Top Chef-y cooking method can take chicken to the next level too.

Sous-vide, for all its culinary upsides, is uniquely suited for the tender preparation of meat dishes. Spare ribs, lamb shanks, and beef tenderloin have become universal staples for the culinary method, with the combined impact of ease of preparation and flavor enrichment making red meat an ideal candidate for going under the vacuum.

That being said, sous-vide is superbly suited for those looking toward the lighter side of the meat spectrum. Chicken, rightly or wrongly, is generally held as meat better suited to holding its sauce than holding its own.

You’d be hard pressed to find a foodie or seasoned chef who’d argue that Kobe beef requires a slathering of steak sauce, but serving chicken alone is a much rarer proposition. Whether you’re including the world’s most common poultry in a curry dish, as the staple of a pasta preparation, or with a Mediterranean-style tomato base, the chicken itself is hardly ever the sole focus.

Sous-vide, with its culinary basis in steeping meat in its own sauces, is a superb choice for those looking to create especially rich chicken dishes. Whether you’re shooting for a chicken korma dish or something more conventionally Italian in its inspiration, a competent chef would tend to improve the final product by wrapping it as a sous-vide preparation beforehand.

Even relatively simple Italian (or Italian-American) preparations like Chicken Margherita or Chicken Marsala are deeply indebted to the flavorful additions that their sauces bring. Chicken, whether prepared with light sauce or a heavier base, only gains a deeper character when it has time to absorb in its accompanying flavor.

As a starting point for the more adventurous chef, give something South Asian a spin. In my never-humble opinion, chicken is the meat best suited for curry dishes, and sous-vide’s flavor-enhancing impact on sauces makes it a natural go-to for curry preparation.

It also helps cut away a lot of the mess that might go into whipping up a chicken dish right on the spot—just remove the bag contents right into your slow cooker, and you’re only minutes away from having a hearty curry dish right at your fingertips.

So go wild (within reason) and swap a lot of unnecessary prep hassle for something that brings a deeper character to your chicken.

How To Sous-Vide Your Chicken

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Graham Crackers Gone Wild! Top 10 Ways to Use Your Leftover S’mores Ingredients

It’s time to stock up on chocolate bars, marshmallows, and graham crackers. It’s s’mores season. Typically you’ll see the chocolate go first, then the marshmallows, but every year those poor graham crackers are left over to stale up. It’s a shame…rarely does someone crave a plain honey graham cracker. I actually enjoy one with some peanut butter spread and dunked in an ice cold glass of milk. But I digress. For the rest of you who don’t like the poor old “boring” graham, here are some ideas for what to do with them (other than s’mores of course):

10. Graham Cracker Peanut Butter Bars

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Recipe: The Wannabe Chef

Last time I did a top ten, I offended some by offering unhealthy choices. Well, as the humble person I am, and very thoughtful I may add, I found a choice that is gluten free. Gluten free, yet still scrumptious. Peanut butter, chocolate, graham crackers. You’re welcome.

9. Graham Cracker Chicken Bites

GrahamCrackerChicken

Recipe: My Kitchen Snippets

I bet you thought these would all be deserts. Well, yet again you are wrong. Screw corn flakes—let’s add some sweet honey graham crackers to the mix and impress guests of all ages. This really is sweet and savory. Maybe for desert, you can get out the mallows.

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