100 Ways to Use Beer in Food and Drinks #12: Steak

BEEF, it’s what’s for dinner (and beer). Really, you can’t go wrong with beef and beer (unless you’re one of those stuck-up vegetarians…no offense of course). At first I was thinking I’d just soak a nice cut of steak in some stout, maybe crust it with espresso, and call it a day. Then, the genius of my other half suggested shishkabobs.

With the sweltering heat after a day at the beach, it was the perfect time to grill up some raw meat, veggies and shrimp. I don’t believe in segregation, so I’m all for including the shrimpies with the beef. But before I get ahead of myself—onto the beer potion.

We decided on some homemade teriyaki sauce. Teriyaki sauce is one of those things that should be sweet and tangy with just a hint of a bite to it. Turns out,  finishing the sauce with a good brew gives it a complementary tang.  When used as a glaze or dipping sauce, you can actually taste the beer as an end note of this beefy chef-d’oeuvre.

We used it as a marinade and let the steak bathe in the sauce for a long time before finally grilling it. We also marinated the shrimp in it, which was equally titillating. Brushing some veggies (and pineapple) with the sauce when it hit the grill gave them a little extra sizzling flavor too. Finally, I made corn roasted on the grill, in husks—the only way to truly have corn on the cob. It’s a great recipe for a summer day to impress your friends. You’re welcome.

Beer Infused Teriyaki Sauce

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Revenge Served Cold: Nettle Pesto

Growing up in England nettles were a large part of my childhood, whether I liked it or not — and I generally didn’t. This wretched plant caused many a tear in my household, its stinging leaves leaving immense pain that lasted for hours, with little sympathy from my parents as I was usually up to no good in the garden or local park, causing said sting.

When I saw nettles at the local farmers’ market here in D.C., I jumped at the chance to fight back, to serve justice to this leafy plant once and for all. There’s very little you can actually do with nettles, the most obvious was soup, but in these late spring months it seemed a tad too warm for that. I settled on pesto, a simple and versatile sauce that I could use in many dishes.

We’ve cooked basil brownies and avocado milkshakes, now it’s time for the nettle pesto.


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