Ink Worthy Eats: Top 10 Food Tattoos, Part 2

With heatwaves come lots of skin. And these days, lots of skin comes with tons of ink. It seems the days of tramp stamps, tribal signs and Chinese characters have given way to our new national pastime: food. Here’s our 2nd sampling of indulgent food tattoos.

Top 10 Food Tattoos, Part 2

10. We get it. Everyone loves bacon.

(Photo: Fuck Yeah, Tattoos!)

9. What a brave little toaster. (Best movie ever, no?)


(Photo: Fuck Yeah, Tattoos!)

8. Be kind to the pizza, bro!


(Photo: Fuck Yeah, Tattoos!)

7. Margaritaville. (Lost shaker and salt, get it?!)

(Photo: Fuck Yeah, Tattoos!)

6. Constant countdown to happy hour.

(Photo: Fuck Yeah, Tattoos!)

Next: Top 5 Food Tattoos

Late Night Refrigerator Raid: Spicy PB&J Noodles

When you work in the restaurant business, dinner time can often be at midnight or later. Let’s be honest, much of the time dinner is at 2 AM after the bars close. When cooks get together and open the refrigerator, some funny and pretty freakin’ delicious things can happen. I was recently part of a Ramen noodle fest at 3 AM that included a bag of frozen peas and about 10 poached eggs. Oh, and that BBQ chicken pizza from homemade dough at 3:30? Epic. I mean, using a dough recipe or letting it rise is not that necessary when you’re hungry. Just throw some yeast, sugar, flour, oil, and water in a bowl and it will probably turn into dough…

The recipe I’m about to share with you doesn’t include amounts because how are you supposed to measure things when you can’t even really see that straight? And to be honest, I don’t really remember how much of what went into the pot. I’ll leave the level of spiciness and sweetness and peanuty-ness up to you. All you need to do is to make the sauce taste delicious. It’s not that difficult. I’m not lying when I say this is legitimately one of the most delicious late night meals I have had in a while.

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Feed Us Back: Comments of the Week

Patty H. is lovingly concerned for those peeps in a jar:

Love it! Made me smile, but then, just as I clicked to leave the site, I thought “Oh no, I bet they can’t breath.” So, just wondering about maybe some holes in the lid.

We’ll make sure they’re safe. PS — an ES sneak preview — next week we’ll be featuring different ways to cook with peeps. Have any ideas? Send us your links.

– Hope everyone has made good use of our 100 ways to cook with sriracha post. Michael Birchenall of Foodservice Monthly checks in with a 101st recipe:

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100 Ways to Use Sriracha

Sriracha.

Condiment of the gods. Maker of everything delicious. Mispronounced as often as pho.

Don’t waste your time here. Call it cock sauce and get cookin’

Click on the photos for full recipes.

More 100 Ways:
100 Ways to Cook Bacon
100 Ways to Cook an Egg
100 Ways to Cook a Banana
100 Ways to Cook a Tomato
100 Ways to Cook With Guinness

Attack of the Meme: The 15 Best Food Charts

According to well, me, and this article, tumblr is the new twitter. And I can’t get enough of I Love Charts for their hysterical, progressive and, of course, food-focused content. Here’s the best 15 food charts from the past few weeks. Yes, weeks, they post that much.

15. Dirt Gets Such a Bad Rap

(Photo: Fake Science)

14. Top Left, Please

(Photo: Bad Postcards)

13. Truth

(Photo: Extremely Moderate)

12. Everything is Better in Japanese

(Photo: Interior Design Room)

11. #5

(Photo: Sound of Science)

10. Where’s Coddled?

(Photo: Flowing Data)

9. Apparently “The Jitters” is a Technical Term

(Photo: Unclear)

8. Chanukah Wish List

(Photo: Zouch)

7. What Is a Cheeseburger, Alex?

(Photo: Zouch)

6. Team Sriracha

(Photo: The Sriracha Cookbook Blog)

Next: The top 5

Top 10 New Things to Put in Your Drink

We’ve certainly never been against drinking here at ES — it just traditionally takes a back seat to eating. However, in the last year we’ve found ourselves getting more and more excited about cocktails — because every time we go out we discover our favorite ingredients have migrated from the plate to the glass. From fruits and vegetables to spices and more, here are our top 10 favorite new things to mix in our drinks.

10. Saffron

A saffron ice cube anchors the Venetian, one of several new food-inspired cocktails at Tulio in Seattle.

Not just for paella anymore, the Spanish spice has started showing up in cocktail glasses, too. Saffron Restaurant and Lounge in Minneapolis has mixed the pricier-than-gold flakes into saffron-mango mojitos, saffron-blood orange martinis, and their current offering, the gin-based Saffron Rose. Tulio, an Italian restaurant in Seattle, recently introduced The Venetian — a vodka cocktail poured over an orange-y saffron ice cube. For those experimenting at home, the folks over at Video Jug have a video on how to mix a saffron vodka martini. (Tulio photo: Evan Johnson)

 

9. Beets

Fresh beet juice, ginger and vodka make up the Beetnik at Colorado's Dogwood Cocktail Cabin.

It’s hard to make a drink look more dramatic than when filled up with bright red beet juice, as in the beet sangria at New York’s Tailor or the Beetnik, a vodka-ginger-beet concoction served at Crested Butte, Colorado’s Dogwood Cocktail Cabin. Meanwhile, the gals at The Humble Kitchen have a recipe for their own tequila-based Beetnik. (Dogwood photo: eenwall)

8. Mole

Mole bitters liven up the Palermo Gentleman at Death + Co. in New York.

Mexico’s spicy-sweet chocolate treat is making the surprising transition from tamales to cocktails via Bittermens Bitters newest product, Xocolatl Mole Bitters. A neat way to add quite a substantial kick to any drink, the mole bitters are showing up in new cocktails like the tequila-based Chipilo at Brooklyn’s Buttermilk Channel and several options at Manhattan’s Death + Co. (Photo: Vidiot)

7. Sriracha

Every Top Chef contestant’s favorite secret ingredient can save a cocktail menu too, as in “El Scorcho,” a fiery mix of habanero infused vodka, sriracha, and jalapeno foam at Bend, Oregon’s Blacksmith restaurant. The sauce also makes a great replacement for Tabasco in bloody Marys — the blog White on Rice Couple has a great recipe, and if you want to get super-serious, check out their instructions on how to make sriracha from scratch. (Photo: White on Rice Couple)

6. Chinese Five Spice

A Chinese five spice grilled lemon garnishes the Fortune Teller at Bar Pleiades in New York.

Another ingredient Chinese chefs may be shocked to discover in American cocktails, C5S is showing up both as a garnish, as in the Fortune Teller drink served at the Surrey Hotel‘s new Bar Pleiades in New York, and as the basis of a drink, such as Imbibe magazine’s Five-Spice Fizz. (Photo: Bar Pleiades)

Next: Top 5 New Things to Put in Your Drink

Plantains Three Ways

green-salsa-plantains

Fruit is pretty great and all, but how much better is it when deep-fried? Am I right?

Well, I know I am. Having grown up on Nuyorican restaurants, I’ve been a pretty rabid plantain fan for a long time. But one longtime frustration was that I could not, for the life of me, figure out how to recreate these delicious little fritters at home. But, after much experimentation and web browsing, I’m happy to report I’ve started to get the hang of it. The secret turns out to be the same secret as every other delicious restaurant food: you’ve got to throw all delusions of semi-healthiness to the wind. Oil, baby. Lots of it. Like seriously, gallons. Cooking plantains in a tablespoon or two of oil always resulted in bland, starchy discs with not-quite-right texture, but once I worked up the courage to really douse them in oil, I’ve been able to make both sweet, rich plantains from super-ripe bananas, as well as crispy, more hearty ones from green bananas.

You don’t necessarily need a deep-fryer, but you need to cut those plantains thin, fill your saucepan up with a whole lot of the golden stuff, get it nice and bubbly, then let ’em fry for just a few minutes.

That dilemma solved, obviously I was ready to start getting a little wacky. As much as I love eating plain crispy plantains with the simple garlic sauce they serve at Puerto Rican places, I wondered if they couldn’t stand for a little spicing up at home, so I took three different attempts at crafting a more creative plantain. No, this is not a lame, haute cusine “three-way” dish, but merely three different ways they can be prepared…

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